¿Cómo se llama usted?  What is your name?
Digame su dirección   Tell me your address
Número de identidad/pasaporte Identity/passport number

Me han robado    I have been robbed
Me han robado en casa  my house has been burgled
Me han robado en la calle  I have been robbed in the street

Han llevado  ....    They have taken …
La cartera     wallet
El bolso     handbag
La bolsa de viaje    travel bag
La tarjeta de crédito   credit card
Dinero en efectivo   cash
Las joyas     jewels
Los documentos    documents
Las llaves     keys
El móvil     mobile phone

Han roto  …    They have broken …
El cristal de la ventana   Window pane   
La cerradura (de la puerta)  (door) lock 
Las rejas (de la ventana)  (window) bars

¿Cuándo?
This morning    Esta mañana
This afternoon    Esta tarde
At one o’clock    a la una
At half past two     a las dos y media
Between 10 and 12   entre las diez y las doce
At night     en la noche

¿Tiene seguro?    Have you got insurance?
¿Tiene alarma?    Have you got an alarm?

¡Ladrón!     Thief!
Socorro!     Help!!
¡Vete!     Go away!
Necesito ayuda    I need help (assistance)

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