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Going Native is about living in Spain, and about learning Spanish, but it's also about much, much more than that. Going Native explains all those little everyday things that happen in Spain that you've never quite understood. It is full of fascinating observations on the way things are done and is overflowing with tips on how to break through the language barrier and start communicating with the people around you.

Written by language teacher Jane Cronin, Going Native gives detailed help with speaking the real language to real people in real situations. It is written in a light-hearted way that will strike a chord with young and old alike, and will give you the confidence you need to become part of the everyday life which surrounds you.


Contents:
  1. Throwing your voice
  2. Putting your foot in it
  3. Spanglish
  4. The family
  5. It’s a piece of cake
  6. Speaking like the Indians
  7. Filling in forms
  8. Going to the bank
  9. The language of courtesy
  10. Shops
  11. Padding it out
  12. Taboos
  13. Pronouns
  14. Mild insults
  15. Meat
  16. Eating habits
  17. Cars
  18. Describing words
  19. Ser and estar
  20. Road signs
  21. Jobs
  22. An important little word
  23. Being negative
  24. ‘-dad’ words
  25. Clothing
  26. The weather
  27. Shopping
  28. Computers
  29. Animal noises
  30. Maths
  31. ‘-ísimo’
  32. First names
  33. Surnames
  34. Cooking instructions
  35. At the police station
  36. Abbreviations and acronyms
  37. You can do it!
Desiderata for Life in Spain.
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Spanish Pronunciation - Part 1 of 6 

Click here to see the rest of this series and to download the whiteboard text as a .pdf file

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