JANE CRONIN – WELCOME TO MY WEBSITE

I am a teacher of English and Spanish and I have lived in Spain since 1988, firstly in Santander and Asturias in the north, then in San Pedro del Pinatar in Murcia, and now in the small village of Jacarilla in the province of Alicante.  Since 2002 I have mainly worked as a Spanish teacher for English speaking residents and in that role have helped literally thousands of people to learn about Spanish language and culture via my classes and presentations.    

In this website you will find plenty of free material to help you learn Spanish, including my video tutorials and vocabulary lists.  Also please take time to look at my website shop where I have a wide range of products: books, CDs, DVDs, downloads and also two interactive Spanish courses all at very reasonable prices.

Click here to see the rest of this series and to download the whiteboard text as a .pdf file.

 

Spanish Pronunciation - Part 1 of 6

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